Forget everything you know about CSS. Or at least, be ready to reconsider a lot of it. If like me you've been writing CSS for over a decade, CSS in 2020 looks nothing like what you were used to.

Instead of breakpoints, we can now leverage CSS Grid to make dynamic, responsive layouts that adapt to any viewport size with fewer lines of code. Instead of relying on global stylesheets, CSS-in-JS lets us colocate our styles with our components to build themeable design systems.

And most of all, Tailwind CSS has burst onto the scene and, through its use of utility-first CSS, forced us to reconsider the traditional dogma of semantic class names.

Whether all this change makes you want to write a hyped-up blog post or an angry Twitter rant, we are here to present the data, highlight the trends, and hopefully guide you through another eventful year of CSS!

Team

The State of CSS Survey is created and maintained by:

Download Our Data

You can download the raw JSON data for this survey. Let us know if you end up making your own data visualizations!

Other Links

Thanks

Thanks to all the people who helped us design the survey, including Chen Hui-Jing, Philip Jägenstedt, Adam Argyke, Ahmad Shadeed, Robert Flack, Dominic Nguyen, Fantasai, and Kilian Valkhof.

Additional thanks to Alexey Pyltsyn for his help with translations.

Credits & Stuff

The site is set in IBM Plex Mono. Questions? Feedback? Get in touch!

And now, let's see what CSS has been up to this year!

Stay Tuned

If you'd like to know when we release additional results or announce next year's edition, just leave us your email below:

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